Russian justice or in-justice

President Vladimir Putin has been elected for a third term and he is changing laws and ruling with an iron fist. No one is allowed to protest on any matter and all opposition members are being investigated by the police.The latest act was the arrest and sentence of three punk rocker girls from the group Pussy Riot.

A Moscow court Friday handed a two-year jail sentence to three feminist punk rockers who infuriated the Kremlin and captured world attention by ridiculing President Vladimir Putin in Russia’s main church.

Information from   Yahoo news

They were protesting about the election and the rule of President Vladimir Putin also the changes made to the laws.

This is seen as a court ruling and a political act under the orders of Vladimir Putin, with protests all around the world.

Witnesses saw about 60 Pussy Riot fans — ex-chess champion and fierce Putin critic Garry Kasparov among them — being taken away into waiting vans by police during more than three hours of hearing.

Vladimir Putin has already used his power to slap new restrictions on protests and political organisations with foreign sources of income.

After the sentence a protest outside the Cathedral by about 30 people was quickly stopped.

The world would need to stop helping Russia in any way to change things or the people will start a bloody revolution.

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15 responses to “Russian justice or in-justice

  1. I’m so divided about this. Being British and all for free speech and all that, I am of course appalled that this is happening. But on the other hand this is how things are in Russia. Whether we approve or not it is how it is. These women know their country better than we do. They must have known the consequence. The punishment is extreme indeed from our perspectives as Brits but I think they would have been prepared for it.
    I don’t know how acceptable I think it is to sing something in a cathedral that was laced with obscenities. I’m not religious but I can see it would be offensive. I think the attention given to the outcome of this trial has overshadowed the actual act of what they did which overall was not very nice. Hence my mixed feelings. I’m finding it all very interesting. So many people supporting them but no one actually saying that perhaps it was a little inappropriate. How well would it be received if a British Band sang in St Paul’s Cathedral a song full of obscenities about the Royal family for instance. It wouldn’t go down well with the Church. I think they showed disrespect. I understand their political motivations but maybe they chose the wrong place or again maybe not… Hence why my dilemma on why I stand…

    • I agree with your comment about obscenities in church, the protest was against Putin and the church, perhaps they should have done it on the steps outside, it might have went down a little better.

    • I’m pretty sure they had a very good idea of the possible consequences, and yet they did it anyway. Extremely brave in my view. And I think it’s worth noting that they didn’t do it in the church simply to be provocative. It was the church leader’s close association and support for Putin that they were protesting about. So the protest was aimed directly at the church. You’re right, it wasn’t very nice. But they didn’t want to be nice because they were angry and wanted to highlight what they saw as unconscionable actions of the church leader.

      I also think that it’s worth noting that the church themselves believe the sentence was too harsh. A simple fine would have been far more appropriate. But the fact that they’ve been given a two year sentence highlights exactly why the church, supposedly an institution that stands up for moral and ethical behavior, shouldn’t closely associate itself with Putin’s rule. Which of course is the point they were trying to make.

      • As i said Lance Putin rules every thing in Russia, i notice the church did not say that the sentence was to harsh until the trial was over.

  2. I refrain from venting my viewpoint in case I get taken away by KGB, Kremlin’s Gone Banana’s….;)

    • Putin rules every one, no one will stand up to him if you do your are arrested but the people put him in and will have to live with it for five years.

  3. A gripping life

    Putin makes me sick. He’s like a big bully. I think it was very brave what they did.

  4. This is, indeed, a lightning rod of a story. I guess the thing that interests me the most is the charge that they were imprisoned for: hooliganism. That sounds like I word I would make up for a blog post, but they must have it in their legal code. Hooliganism? Two years in prison for that crime? Wow? What would a person get if convicted of shenanigery?

  5. Had no idea – haven’t been watching the news. Thank you for this update. I agree the world needs to do something about Russia. I wonder what the US stance is…have to look that up. The US seems a bit cowardly lately – regarding firm public statements of events in other countries of significant importance and politics or human rights.
    Liz

    • They have been quite but theres an election coming up soon after that we should hear all about their thoughts and where they are going next 🙂

  6. ‘As i said Lance Putin rules every thing in Russia, i notice the church did not say that the sentence was to harsh until the trial was over.’

    I completely agree Harry. For the record I was responding to Lynda-Renham Cook but I do think it’s an astute observation that the church only condemned the sentence afterwards. The band members themselves expected such an outcome. So I’m sure the church could have done so too and therefore appealed for leniency before the decision was reached. But like you say, Putin runs everything in Russia.

  7. ‘As i said Lance Putin rules every thing in Russia, i notice the church did not say that the sentence was to harsh until the trial was over.’

    I was actually replying to Lynda Renham-Cook’s comment, but I completely agree with your point nontheless Harry. He does, and not taking exception to their harsh treatment until after the sentence has been handed out comes across as a little spineless.

  8. Spinless of the church I of course mean!

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