Worlds Smallest Computer.

Raspberry Pi too tasty as huge demand crashes sites

The Pi is about the size of a man’s hand.

Read the full story here.

This has been developed to make it possible for every child in school to get one and to learn how to program a computer.

All proceeds from the project are going to charity as the circuitboard was created by volunteers headed by computer technician Eben Upton at Cambridge university in London.

Demand for a new miniature computer designed to interest children in coding sent the websites selling the product crashing earlier today – just hours after it went on sale.

The Raspberry Pi runs from a Linux operating system.The Raspberry Pi – which costs just £22 – is being hailed as a revolutionary new device that could create a new generation of programmers.

It is a rudimentary open circuit board that, once connected to a monitor, mouse and keyboard, works as a conventional computer.

Using this, Pi is designed to get children into computing coding, a trend that was sparked by the BBC Micro and Sinclair Spectrum in the 1980s.

The £22 model on sale today [Wednesday  29/2/12 ] is actually the pricier version of Raspberry Pi – a stripped-down £16 model will go on sale later this year.

The circuitboard can be plugged into older analogue television sets as well as digital counterparts and it harnesses power from mobile phone chargers.

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28 responses to “Worlds Smallest Computer.

  1. That’s crazy that they want to train kids to be able to program computers! I’m sure adults would be better suited? Plus, adults are the ones that could use this for jobs, not kids!

  2. The teens in Lily’s neck of the woods must never play Video games…round here…anyone who has a computer needs a Teenager to keep it going…lol

  3. I bet my 2 yo granddaughter could do it!

  4. Oooh, I’m forwarding this to my son, the computer programmer. He started rudimentary computer lessons when he was about 7 or 8 years old. It wet his appetite for more. He took computer classes all the way through high school and majored in computer science engineering in university. He now has two elementary school age kids, who might benefit from the Rasberry thing.

  5. It’s quite mind-boggling how computer technology has evolved in the last 30 years, and how affordable everything is. Thanks for the info on this new device.

  6. Interesting. I’m going to share this on FB if you don’t mind, my brother would probably be interested to read this. Thanks Harry.

    • Marica, go ahead, its great to see you back in the blogging world after all this time, how are you and are you still taking a break.

      • I’m fine thankyou Harry. Got mountains to climb in my personal life but lots of positive things going on under the surface. Yes, still taking a break but I am trying to keep up with the blogs that I really enjoy, such as yours 🙂 I’m always lurking…

  7. Glad to here that your doing ok, Marcia the lurker 😆

  8. We need as many young programmers as we can get. To keep kids in junior high interested in math, science, and technology may help solve some of the problems us boomers are leaving to them. Great idea! Thanks for sharing about it. Hope they get more soon.

  9. Everything is going the way of smaller just when my eyesight is requiring BIGGER. Wouldn’t you know it….

    Of course, this computer is meant for children and I’m not a child (well not usually)! 😉

  10. hey mate grab your liebster award here ..
    http://abeerarashid.wordpress.com/2012/03/07/the-liebster-blog-award/
    congrats for this ! 🙂
    you write too good

  11. Its an amazing venture, we dont have alot of those in africa, and am sure if kids dont aim at crushing them to reveal whats inside they surely will be helpful.

  12. There are not many about yet because as soon as it went on the web the web site crashed by people wanting to buy them.

    I’ll call back at your site and will leave a comment.

  13. Pingback: 12-03-12 Love Education Weekly Showcase | Love All Blogs

  14. Pingback: 12-02-12 Love Tech Weekly Showcase | Love All Blogs

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